and I’ll keep wonderin’, and wonderin’when will my life begin? [x]

and I’ll keep wonderin’, and wonderin’
when will my life begin? [x]

Mildred Davis and Harold Lloyd in Dr. Jack (1922)


Mildred Davis and Harold Lloyd in Dr. Jack (1922)

Mildred Davis and Harold Lloyd in Dr. Jack (1922)

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Harold Lloyd and Mildred Davis in Motion Picture Magazine, April 1922

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Harold Lloyd and Mildred Davis in Motion Picture Magazine, April 1922

Mildred Davis in Motion Picture Magazine, 1922
Mildred Davis in Motion Picture Magazine, 1922
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Harold Lloyd and Mildred Davis in Motion Picture Magazine, April 1922

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Harold Lloyd and Mildred Davis in Motion Picture Magazine, April 1922


Mildred Davis, who is Harold Lloyd’s leading lady, and was seen with him in “A Sailor Made Man.” She will be seen opposite Lloyd shortly in a new comedy which is being temporarily called “Grandma’s Boy” and is to be released by Pathe. Is it any wonder that Harold Lloyd finds it easy to smile all the time? Who wouldn’t?

— Dramatic Mirror Magazine, April 1922

Mildred Davis, who is Harold Lloyd’s leading lady, and was seen with him in “A Sailor Made Man.” She will be seen opposite Lloyd shortly in a new comedy which is being temporarily called “Grandma’s Boy” and is to be released by Pathe. Is it any wonder that Harold Lloyd finds it easy to smile all the time? Who wouldn’t?

Dramatic Mirror Magazine, April 1922

Silent film comedienne Mildred Davis in a May 1922 issue of Motion Picture Classic magazine, photo by Kenneth Alexander

Silent film comedienne Mildred Davis in a May 1922 issue of Motion Picture Classic magazine, photo by Kenneth Alexander


Hers is a rare talent too—and we are glad that she developed it—glad she broke away from the eternal severities of her illustrious ancestors and put on the cap and bells—glad that she is making it her job to serve the common good by practicing and promoting the gospel of laughter.

— “Mildred Yea and Nay,” Motion Picture Classic magazine, May 1922

Hers is a rare talent too—and we are glad that she developed it—glad she broke away from the eternal severities of her illustrious ancestors and put on the cap and bells—glad that she is making it her job to serve the common good by practicing and promoting the gospel of laughter.

— “Mildred Yea and Nay,” Motion Picture Classic magazine, May 1922


But you know we were Quakers. We said ‘yea and nay’ and ‘thee and thou’ and applied every Scriptural injunction literally. I went to a Friends school and we lived very quietly. 
Poor old William Penn and all my illustrious ancestors turned over in their graves, I suppose, when we left the home in Philadelphia that had been ours for fifty years and went to Seattle, Washington. And when I took dancing lessons and went later to Los Angeles and into the movies, they must have simply writhed in distress. But if they could have seen me in New York!

— Mildred Davis “roguishly” discussing her Quaker ancestors in a May 1922 issue of Motion Picture Classic magazine. Photo by Kenneth Alexander.

But you know we were Quakers. We said ‘yea and nay’ and ‘thee and thou’ and applied every Scriptural injunction literally. I went to a Friends school and we lived very quietly. 

Poor old William Penn and all my illustrious ancestors turned over in their graves, I suppose, when we left the home in Philadelphia that had been ours for fifty years and went to Seattle, Washington. And when I took dancing lessons and went later to Los Angeles and into the movies, they must have simply writhed in distress. But if they could have seen me in New York!

— Mildred Davis “roguishly” discussing her Quaker ancestors in a May 1922 issue of Motion Picture Classic magazine. Photo by Kenneth Alexander.